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History Of Maple Syrup | Restaurants Riverside San Bernardino | Lunch Corona | Breakfast Jurupa Valley

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In case you wanted to know or were just curious, here is a great little write up from Time Magazine on the history of Maple Syrup by

When you think of maple syrup, whose 2009 season is just now wrapping up, the first image that pops into your mind is probably a huge tree trunk with a few metal buckets strapped on. Maybe you picture workhorses slogging through the snow, a sleigh laden with tree sap in tow. Maybe there’s a little wooden shack with a chimney emitting a plume of steam. What you might not picture are the dollar signs many are seeing around this surging agricultural commodity — maple syrup producers are celebrating high yields and record retail prices this year.

For some 300 years, however, sugaring stuck close by that rural idyll. Early settlers in the U.S. Northeast and Canada learned about sugar maples from Native Americans. Various legends exist to explain the initial discovery. One is that the chief of a tribe threw a tomahawk at a tree, sap ran out and his wife boiled venison in the liquid. Another version holds that Native Americans stumbled on sap running from a broken maple branch.

From the 17th century onward, dairy farmers who wanted to supplement their income from milk — or who just needed a source of sweetener that was better and cheaper than sugar or molasses — drilled small holes in the trees during the brief weather window between winter and spring. (Sap typically runs out of maple trees on days when the temperature is around 40 degrees following a night when the mercury dropped below freezing.) The farmers called the maple tree stands “sugar bushes” and hung buckets under the drilled holes. Every day or two — depending on how fast the sap was running out of the trees — the farmers would empty out the buckets into larger containers or tanks and haul the watery substance to a “sugar house” usually built in the woods. Here’s where the magic happened.

It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup because sap is about 98% water. Sugar makers boiled off most of the water over a wood fire — what they were left with was brown sweet syrup. Some sugar makers heated the sap further, turning it into crystallized sugar. Over time, the industry evolved enough that companies from Quebec to Vermont produced ready-made “evaporators,” essentially giant frying pans with fire boxes built underneath.

As quaint as this image is and as marketable — check out the old-timey drawings on the sides of plastic maple syrup jugs — this is not the face of modern maple syrup making.

These days, most serious sugar makers have foregone labor-intensive buckets, in favor of tubing systems. The holes bored in sugar maples in early spring are usually made with a cordless drill. Sugar makers insert small plastic spouts into the holes and connect the spouts to huge webs of plastic tubing that route the precious sap into large tanks. Many of these sugar bushes even have vacuum systems that suck the sap out of the trees to increase yield, along with oil-fueled furnaces and reverse osmosis filters that remove some water prior to boiling. The technology has changed dramatically, but in essence the process is virtually the same. Collect sap, reduce over heat.

As the natural foods movement has picked up steam in recent years, maple syrup has become, along with honey, an increasingly attractive alternative to processed cane sugar. If you’re wondering where Aunt Jemima or Log Cabin syrup fit into this picture — these common table products are not real maple syrup. The tagline for Log Cabin, which is made with sugar, is “Authentic Maple Tasting Syrup for over 120 years.” This careful wording is intentional and crafted to avoid false advertising claims. (Most brands of maple-flavored pancake toppings are made with corn syrup.)

The actual maple syrup industry has grown some 10% in each of the past four years — and no, maple syrup it not just for flapjacks. These days, some maple syrup devotees use the liquid sweetener as a substitute for sugar in everything from cakes to stir fry. And let’s not forget the Master Cleanse diet — more accurately a fast — in which people eat nothing for days on end, subsisting only on a drink made of water, lemon juice, cayenne pepper and maple syrup.

Thanks to increasing demand and poor sugaring weather in some regions over the past several years, retail prices have spiked to as much as $80 per gallon in some places. In the current sagging economy, that definitely counts as a sweet spot.

Are You Hungry Riverside? | Vicky’s Burgers Jurupa Valley | Burgers Inland Empire

vickys-burgers-riverside-restaurants-inland-empireHungry? Get ready to lick your plate clean at Vicky’s Burgers in Riverside. Order a cheeseburger or just stick with a side of fries at Vicky’s Burgers serving those dining in the Riverside region of the Inland Empire.

Want to enjoy our restaurant without the wait? Get it to go.

Endless parking options are readily available here at Vicky’s Burgers. You’ll also find plenty of safe spaces to lock up your bike if you prefer to cycle to our restaurant.

Prices don’t get much better than this either, with typical meals running under the $15 mark.

Why Eat Local? | Great Hamburgers Riverside Inland Empire | Restaurants Inland Empire

Here are the 10 reasons you should eat more local food:

  1. Supports local farms: Buying local food keeps local farms healthy and creates local jobs at farms and in local food processing and distribution systems.
  2. Boosts local economy: Food dollars spent at local farms and food producers stay in the local economy, creating more jobs at other local businesses.
  3. Less travel: Local food travels much less distance to market than typical fresh or processed grocery store foods, therefore using less fuel and generating fewer greenhouse gases.
  4. Less waste: Because of the shorter distribution chains for local foods, less food is wasted in distribution, warehousing and merchandising.
  5. More freshness: Local food is fresher, healthier and tastes better, because it spends less time in transit from farm to plate, and therefore, loses fewer nutrients and incurs less spoilage.
  6. New and better flavors: When you commit to buy more local food, you’ll discover interesting new foods, tasty new ways to prepare food and a new appreciation of the pleasure of each season’s foods.
  7. Good for the soil: Local food encourages diversification of local agriculture, which reduces the reliance on monoculture—single crops grown over a wide area to the detriment of soils.
  8. Attracts tourists: Local foods promote agritourism—farmers’ markets and opportunities to visit farms and local food producers help draw tourists to a region.
  9. Preserves open space: Buying local food helps local farms survive and thrive, keeping land from being redeveloped into suburban sprawl.
  10. Builds more connected communities: Local foods create more vibrant communities by connecting people with the farmers and food producers who bring them healthy local foods. As customers of CSAs and farmers markets have discovered, they are great places to meet and connect with friends as well as farmers.

Value Of Fresh Lettuce And Tomato | Best Burgers Inland Empire | Riverside Restaurants

lettuce-tomato-vickys-burgersLettuce and tomatoes both help you reach your weekly veggie intake — 21 cups for men or 17.5 cups for women, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. They offer some nutritional differences — for instance, tomatoes contain the cancer-fighting compound lycopene, a nutrient not found in lettuce. However, lettuce and tomatoes also share a few common essential nutrients that help maintain your health.

Fiber

Tomatoes and lettuce both provide you with fiber. Fiber aids in healthy digestion. A cup of chopped tomatoes provides 2.2 grams of fiber toward this goal. Romaine, butterhead and iceberg lettuce contain 2, 1.2 or 1.8 grams of fiber, respectively, per two-cup serving.

Vitamin C

Incorporating tomatoes and lettuce into your diet also helps you reach your recommended daily intake of vitamin C, also called ascorbic acid. Tomatoes serve as a rich source of ascorbic acid. A cup of chopped tomatoes contains 25 milligrams of vitamin C — one-third of the 75 milligrams required daily for women and 28 percent of the 90 milligrams needed for men, according to the NYU Langone Medical Center. Lettuce contains smaller amounts of vitamin C, with a 2-cup serving of romaine, butterhead or iceberg lettuce each providing approximately 4 milligrams of ascorbic acid. Your body uses this vitamin C to nourish your immune system, aid in wound healing and promote healthy brain function.

Vitamin A

Tomatoes and lettuce — particularly romaine lettuce — boost your intake of vitamin A. Your body uses vitamin A to aid in cell communication, and the vitamin A in your system helps to guide cell development. Vitamin A also helps your body for rhodopsin, a chemical important to vision. Men need 3,000 international units of vitamin A daily to maintain good health, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements, while women need 2,333 IU. A two-cup serving of either romaine or butterhead lettuce provides your entire daily intake of vitamin A, containing 8,188 IU or 3,644 IU of vitamin A, respectively. Tomatoes contain 1,499 IU of vitamin A per cup, and a two-cup serving of iceberg lettuce provides 722 IU of vitamin A.

History Of The Pancake | Breakfast Riverside | San Bernardino Restaurants | Pancakes Inland Empire | Vicky’s Burgers Jurupa Valley

Here is a great article posted by National Geographic about the history of the pancake…“one of our faves here at Vicky’s Burgers“!

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Hot off the Griddle, Here’s the History of Pancakes

Our prehistoric ancestors just may have eaten pancakes.

Analyses of starch grains on 30,000-year-old grinding tools suggest that Stone Age cooks were making flour out of cattails and ferns—which, researchers guess, was likely mixed with water and baked on a hot, possibly greased, rock. The result may have been more akin to hardtack than the modern crepe, hotcake, or flapjack, but the idea was the same: a flat cake, made from batter and fried.

Pancake Day: The Most Wonderful Day of the Year

By the time Otzi the Iceman set off on his final hike 5,300 years ago, pancakes—or at least something pancake-like—seem to have been a common item of diet. Otzi, whose remains were discovered in a rocky gully in the Italian Alps in 1991, provided us with a wealth of information about what a denizen of the Neolithic ate. His last meals—along with red deer and ibex—featured ground einkorn wheat. The bits of charcoal he consumed along with it suggest that it was in the form of a pancake, cooked over an open fire.

Whatever the age of the primal pancake, it’s clearly an ancient form of food, as evidenced by its ubiquity in cultural traditions across the globe. The ancient Greeks and Romans ate pancakes, sweetened with honey; the Elizabethans ate them flavored with spices, rosewater, sherry, and apples. They were traditionally eaten in quantity on Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day, a day of feasting and partying before the beginning of Lent.  Pancakes were a good way to use up stores of about-to-be-forbidden perishables like eggs, milk, and butter, and a yummy last hurrah before the upcoming grim period of church-mandated fast.

In the American colonies, pancakes—known as hoe cakes, johnnycakes, or flapjacks—were made with buckwheat or cornmeal. Amelia Simmons’s American Cookery—thought to be the first all-American cookbook, published in 1796—has two recipes for pancakes, one for “Johny Cake, or Hoe Cake,” which calls for milk, “Indian meal,” and molasses, the other for “Indian Slapjack,” which drops the molasses, but adds four eggs.

Thomas Jefferson, who was fond of pancakes, sent a recipe home to Monticello from the President’s House in Washington, D.C., picked up from Etienne Lemaire, his French maître d’hotel (hired for his honesty and skill in making desserts). Lemaire’s “panne-quaiques” were what we would call crepes—made by pouring dollops of thin batter into a hot pan.  Modern pancakes—in Jefferson’s day known as griddlecakes—generally contain a leavening agent and are heftier and puffier.

Flat as a Pancake? Not Likely

The defining characteristic of the entire vast family of pancakes, however—from crepe to griddlecake, blini, bannock, and beyond—is flatness. “Flat as a pancake,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary, has been a catchphrase since at least 1611. Usually it’s applied disparagingly to flat-chested women or to featureless level terrain, such as that of Poland, the glacial plains of Canada, and the state of Kansas.

In 2003, this recurrent comparison led a trio of geographers with senses of humor—after a dullish trip across the American Midwest—to attempt to determine the relative flatnesses of pancakes and Kansas. They constructed a topographic profile of a representative pancake—bought from the local International House of Pancakes—using digital imaging processing and a confocal laser microscope, and a similar profile of Kansas, using data from the United States Geological Survey. The tongue-in-cheek results, published in the Annals of Improbable Research, showed that though pancakes are flat, Kansas is even flatter. Where, mathematically, a value of 1.000 indicates perfect tabletop flatness, Kansas scored a practically horizontal 0.9997. The pancake, in contrast, scored a relatively lumpy 0.957.

In March of this year, Kansan geographers Jerome Dobson and Joshua Campbell—publishing in the wholly reputable Geographical Review – also took on pancakes, pointing out defensively that, while Kansas may be flatter than a pancake, it’s not alone. In fact, there are several states that are even flatter. Their calculations showed that, of the continental states, flattest of the flat is Florida, followed by Illinois, North Dakota, Louisiana, Minnesota, and Delaware. (Least pancake-like: Wyoming, West Virginia, New Hampshire, and Vermont.)

As all researchers hasten to point out, though, the pancake comparison simply isn’t fair. Blow a pancake up to the size of—say, Kansas—and you’ll end up with a fried expanse of ferociously rugged terrain, pock-marked with craters and canyons, studded with Everest-sized air bubbles. Compared to a Kansas-sized pancake—well, practically everything is flat.

The 16th-century measure of flatness was “flat as a flounder.”

Maybe we should go back to that.

Scrambled Egg Breakfast Corona | Breakfast And Lunch Riverside | Vicky’s Burgers Inland Empire

Rührei auf einem Teller
Rührei auf einem Teller

What can we tell you about “scrambled” eggs? We know that Ancient Romans scrambled eggs (ie, broke the yolks and mixed them with the albumen), mixed them up with vegetables and spices, and baked them. These were the first omelettes.

Recipes and methods vary according to time, place and cook’s taste. There is no one “official” recipe; but a plethora of culinary choices. Eggs can be mixed together before cooking, extra ingredients (cream, water, butter, cheese, diced vegetables) may be introduced at any time. Some cooks scramble at the end when the eggs are almost cooked; others prefer constant agitation. Should the final product be yellow or white and yellow? One thing is for certain: on Western European and Americn tables, scrambled eggs were meant to be accompanied by hot buttered toast!

Recipes and methods vary according to time, place and cook’s taste. There is no one “official” recipe; but a plethora of culinary choices. Eggs can be mixed together before cooking, extra ingredients (cream, water, butter, cheese, diced vegetables) may be introduced at any time. Some cooks scramble at the end when the eggs are almost cooked; others prefer constant agitation. Should the final product be yellow or white and yellow? One thing is for certain: on Western European and American tables, scrambled eggs were meant to be accompanied by hot buttered toast!

Scrambled eggs are perfect for breakfast, lunch (Western Sandwich), main course (Egg Foo Young) and midnight snack (24 hour diner fare).

This 14th century Italian text references “scrambled eggs”
“There is so much known about fried, roasted, and scrambled eggs that it is not necessary to speak about them” (from the fourteenth-century Libro della cucina).”
Italian Cuisine: A Cultural History, Alberto Capatti & Massimo Montanari [Columbia University Press:New York] 2003 (p. 77)
[NOTE: This 14th century book is Zambrini, Il libro della cucina del sec. XIV, p. 73. We do not have a copy of this book.]

15th century Italian cookbooks offer a variety of egg dishes. One can discover the similarity to contemporary “scrambled” eggs by reading the method. These were not called “scrambled eggs,” nor can we tell exactly what the finished product would have looked like. This recipe does not mention the egg yolk at all…was it beaten in? Or omitted altogether…leaving the finished product white?

“Eggs Like Fritters. —Platina: On Right Pleasure and Good Health, a critical edition an translation of De Honesta Voluptate et Valetudine, Mary Ella Milham [Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies:Tempe AZ] 1998, Book IX recipe 25 (p. 403)

Martino [Napoli,15th century] offers a recipe for scrambled eggs and cheese, which Terence Scully, noted culinary historian and translator states “is unknown elsewhere. The qualification “in the German fashion: is interesting–but not helpful.”


SOURCE: The Neapolitan Recipe Collection, Cuoco Napoletano, Terence Scully [University of Michigan Press:An Arbor] 2000 (p. 154)
[NOTEs: this book also contains the original wording of the recipe (p. 74); Mr. Scully does not include the history of scrambled eggs in this book.]

[16th Century England]
In England, “buttered eggs,” scrambled eggs cooked with butter and cream, were known by the 16th century. The term “scrambled” appeared a century later. “Eggs served with butter were familiar fasting-day food in Tudor times. Buttered eggs, later to be known as scrambled eggs, came into the cookery books in the seventeenth century. They were laid upon buttered rounds of toasted manchet [bread], and the dish was garnished with pepper and salt.”
Food and Drink in Britain: From the Stone Age to the 19th Century, C. Anne Wilson [Academy Chicago:Chicago] 1991 (p. 144)


 

Origin Of The Omelette | Breakfast Corona | Restaurants Local Riverside

Omelette-origin-vickys-restaurants-riverside-san-bernardinoAlright, so it’s not a question that may keep you up at night but it’s always fun to explore the origins of our favorite foods. Where did they come from, and who’s bright idea was it? Well, we love omelettes here at Vicky’s Restaurants so we thought we would see if we can find out who invented the omelette, and why. Was it an accident or was it inspiration?

So let’s start with the name itself – maybe there’s a clue there. Omelette is a French word, and was first officially used in a French cooking publication, Cuisine Bourgeoisie in the late 17th century although the word ‘alumete’ was used as early as the 14th century. Of course, this is just a name, so odds are that the dish had already been around for a while before finding itself in French cookbooks.

Was it a global discovery?

It seems that omelettes have surfaced at some point in every culture in the world. The Romans were known to use eggs and dairy to create dishes, the Persians had their own omelette variation, and so did the ancient Japanese. It seems that different people at different points all discovered that pouring eggs into a heated pan, along with other ingredients was a great way to eat!

Napoleon’s legend

Perhaps the omelette’s most famous historic moment (or at least myth) was that Napoleon Bonaparte and his army were traveling through a small town, where a local innkeeper served him an omelette. Napoleon was so impressed that he ordered that all the eggs in the town to be gathered to create one huge omelette for his army the next day. Whether or not this actually happened, it did mark the beginning of an annual festival in the town of Bessieres, France where every year a giant omelette is made for all the townspeople to enjoy.

Unclaimed credit!

Tracing back the origins of food is never an easy task, especially with something as universal as omelettes. Evidence of its variations can be found in all kinds of ancient cooking books, and every country has their own variations. It seems that no one actually knows where the omelette was first invented, or by whom. It could have been a master chef, soldier or housewife; whoever it was certainly had no idea how popular it would turn out to be!

So, there’s a bit of background for you. Feeling hungry for an omelette? Well, lucky for you we have a whole bunch of amazing  omelettes for you to try. Get out to Vicky’s for breakfast ASAP!

Value Of Using Fresh Ingredients Like Vicky’s | Burger Restaurant Inland Empire | Breakfast Lunch Dinner Riverside

Vickys-fresh-ingredients-burgers-inland-empire-restaurantFreshness First – The Importance of Using Fresh Ingredients in Cooking

Every time you cook, you automatically reach for that can of veggies, fruits or preserved meat for your dish. Whether it is for yourself and your family, or your guests, your cooking almost always includes processed ingredients straight from the freezer or sealed packet. The fault of using processed or frozen ingredients lies not in the cooking style, but in the lifestyle. We simply do not have the time to search for and buy fresh ingredients every day.

In that process, we are jeopardizing our health and wealth. If you are a fan of canned food or eating out of the box, here are a few reasons that will make you choose fresh ingredients over processed ones.

Freshness for health

Fresh ingredients are always better for preparing healthy food, when compared to processed ingredients. Fresh ingredients are basically those that haven’t been exposed to chemicals or processed in any way to increase their shelf life. They have to be consumed on the same day or within a day or two. Fresh ingredients, including fresh vegetables, meat, spices like basil, cilantro, tomatoes, garlic also retain their nutritious value when you cook them right. Unlike processed foods, they are pure and not adulterated in any way, by exposure to preservatives and other such chemicals.

Food cooked with fresh ingredients is healthier than food cooked with processed ingredients or those stored using preservatives.

Fresh ingredients for better tasting food

When it comes to taste, nothing can beat fresh ingredients. The flavor in the food you cook is best when you use fresh ingredients – whether it is succulent meat, fresh produce, basil that is freshly grown in your own yard, ripe tomatoes from the plant you grew in your window – all of them taste a lot better fresh than preserved. At Vicky’s Restaurants we use fresh ingredients, come try us out and you will agree that food tastes better with fresh ingredients.

Save money with fresh produce

Agreed, that not all fresh veggies and fruits are cheaper than their processed counterparts. That said, eating only canned foods can prove to be expensive in the long run, when the affect of your food choices finally shows up on your health. Also, fresh ingredients need not always be expensive as you think. Where you buy, how much you buy and when you buy the ingredients all make a difference in how much you pay for it. Fresh ingredients get even cheaper if you have the space to grow your favorite veggies and fruits in your own backyard.

Vicky’s Burgers Local Fresh Ingredients | Burger Restaurant Riverside San Bernardino

vickys-burger-fresh-localAt Vicky’s Restaurant our burgers are made of fresh beef from local farmers. Not “natural”, partially local or mixed with all sorts of fillers. Our beef is good for your taste buds and your body.  Our produce…lettuce, tomato’s, etc… is also locally sourced and always the freshest possible, all at a price that’s less expensive than many other burger restaurants.

Vicky’s Restaurant — a true pioneer in this age of compromised taste and quality. It’s real food, really delicious, at a surprisingly affordable price.

Restaurants Inland Empire | Hamburgers Riverside | Breakfast, Lunch And Dinner Restaurant San Bernardino

GET YOUR GRUB ON!!

Vicky’s Burgers would love to assist you in your hunger needs!  Come visit us for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner 7 days a week!  Always fresh always HOT! At At Vicky’s Burger we don’t just have burgers but also delicious milkshakes and also a range of fantastic desserts to round off your meal, they are worth the calories.

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