Category Archives: best burger san bernardino

Best Hamburger Buns | Burger Buns | Vicky’s Burger

The Best Hamburger Buns

The next time you decide to make hamburgers, consider your burger bun options beyond the standard sesame seed or plain white bun for your burger.

  • Ciabatta roll: This thick and sturdy Italian-style bread provides excellent structure for even the juiciest burgers.
  • English muffin: This round and sturdy muffin seems as if it was made for burgers but make sure you toast it slightly first.
  • Kaiser roll: Easily found in your supermarket bakery department, its soft fluffy interior is the perfect vehicle for juicy backyard burgers.
  • Onion roll: Also easily found in your local supermarket, the onion roll provides a zesty accompaniment to any burger by adding a bit of character.
  • Potato roll: By far, the softest and fluffiest of all burger buns.
  • Pretzel roll: Perfectly salty and chewy, this bun takes burger buns to the next level.
  • Sliced bread: The original burger bun. Breads with a denser texture hold up well to thicker patties.

Vicky’s Burger,  502 S. Waterman Ave., San Bernardino, (909) 888-1171

Diner San Bernardino | Breakfast Riverside | Lunch Inland Empire

BLDItem_lBreakfast, Lunch or Dinner…That’s what’s cookin’ at Vicky’s Burgers, make sure to come visit us SOON!!

Vicky’s Burger | Turkey Burgers | Burgers San Bernardino

Vicky's BurgerVicky’s Burger: More Than Just Burgers

Stop by Vicky’s Burger and experience the vast menu we have to offer.  From turkey burgers, chili cheese fries, grilled chicken breast and more, Vicky’s Burger has something for everyone. We pride ourselves in providing good food fast and at very reasonable prices.  Stop by and see what the buzz is all about. Vicky’s Burger…we don’t serve fast food, we serve great food, since 1995

Bacon Cheeseburger | Hamburgers | Burger Restaurants

bacon-cheese-burger-inland-empire1Bacon Cheeseburger Recipe

This is a super yummy recipe. You can use ready to serve bacon if you’d like. These burgers are seasoned hamburgers stuffed with shredded cheese and bacon. The history of this wonderful creation goes back to the summer of 2010. Tim Thalacker, and Andrew Broderick were cooking hamburgers and the bacon and cheese kept sliding off so they wondered what if they could put the bacon and cheese inside the meat? Well they tried it one time and they loved it they are the smartest people in the world.

Vicky’s Burger | Delicious Hamburgers | Healthy Menu Options

Vicky’s Burger: more than just great burgers!

At Vicky’s burger, you’ll find more than just delicious hamburgers.  We pride ourselves in providing a a wide variety of healthy menu options for the entire family.  From standard breakfast dishes such as pancakes, eggs, French toast to Greek salads, falafel, fried chicken and more. Vicky’s Burger has something for everyone.  Stop by and see for your self why Vicky’s Burger is the Inland Empire favorite! Open 7 days a week, Vicky’s Burger, 502 S. Waterman Ave., San Bernardino, 909.888.1171

Cheeseburgers | Best Cheeses for Burgers | Burgers

The Best Cheeses for Burgers

Everyone loves a big juicy burger. And, you’d be hard pressed to find a better topping than a delicious piece of cheese.  Most people have their preference of cheese, American, cheddar, blue, etc. Me, I like them all and sometimes I’ll combine a few just to make it interesting.  Here’s a list of six cheeses that will make the most of your burgers.

  • Cheddar By far, the most popular behind American cheese. It holds up well to strong flavors like bacon and barbecue sauces and melts beautifully.
  • Blue There are a wide variety of blue cheeses: gorgonzola, stilton, Shropshire blue and the like. While some are more pungent than others, these are all typically salty and, quite frankly, stinky but delicious. These work well with a sweet/savory component.
  • Monterey Jack One of the best melting cheeses and thanks to its mild flavor, can handle a variety of different flavor combos.
  • Goat This tangy, crumbly cheese is a lighter burger type cheese.
  • Smoked Gouda This cheese pairs perfectly with smoky barbecue sauce and adds a decadent touch to burgers. Also works well with spicy touches like horseradish.
  • Brie This cheese handles a variety of tasks. From topping burgers to topping turkey sandwiches this should be a go-to. it works especially well with sliced apples and carmalized onions.

Fast Food Restaurant | Burgers | American Diner

Vicky’s Burger: A great American Diner

Vicky’s Burger is a fast-food restaurant serving burgers and other great American eats in an unpretentious relaxed setting. Located in the heart of San Bernardino, its a great place to catch a quick bite with the family.  Enjoy the outdoor seating in a casual setting, while choosing from a vast selection of quick healthy bites. Just check out some of the delicious creations below:

Vicky’s Burger, 502 S. Waterman Ave., San Bernardino, CA 92408 909.888.1171

Vicky’s Burger | American Diner | San Bernardino Restaurants

Vicky’s Burger: serving great food since 1995

Since opening our doors in 1995, Vicky’s Burger is the quintessential American diner serving the San Bernardino area.  We focus on fast and friendly service, serving good, hot food at extremely reasonable prices.  At Vicky’s Burger, we take great pride in serving our guests great food, made with only the highest quality ingredients.  Bringing you fast food in a very unique way, Vicky’s Burger has something for everyone.  Why don’t you stop by and give us a try? Vicky’s Burger, 502 S. Waterman Ave., San Bernardino, CA 92408, (909) 888-1171. Open Monday through Friday, 6:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and Saturday through Sunday, 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

History Of Maple Syrup | Restaurants Riverside San Bernardino | Lunch Corona | Breakfast Jurupa Valley

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In case you wanted to know or were just curious, here is a great little write up from Time Magazine on the history of Maple Syrup by

When you think of maple syrup, whose 2009 season is just now wrapping up, the first image that pops into your mind is probably a huge tree trunk with a few metal buckets strapped on. Maybe you picture workhorses slogging through the snow, a sleigh laden with tree sap in tow. Maybe there’s a little wooden shack with a chimney emitting a plume of steam. What you might not picture are the dollar signs many are seeing around this surging agricultural commodity — maple syrup producers are celebrating high yields and record retail prices this year.

For some 300 years, however, sugaring stuck close by that rural idyll. Early settlers in the U.S. Northeast and Canada learned about sugar maples from Native Americans. Various legends exist to explain the initial discovery. One is that the chief of a tribe threw a tomahawk at a tree, sap ran out and his wife boiled venison in the liquid. Another version holds that Native Americans stumbled on sap running from a broken maple branch.

From the 17th century onward, dairy farmers who wanted to supplement their income from milk — or who just needed a source of sweetener that was better and cheaper than sugar or molasses — drilled small holes in the trees during the brief weather window between winter and spring. (Sap typically runs out of maple trees on days when the temperature is around 40 degrees following a night when the mercury dropped below freezing.) The farmers called the maple tree stands “sugar bushes” and hung buckets under the drilled holes. Every day or two — depending on how fast the sap was running out of the trees — the farmers would empty out the buckets into larger containers or tanks and haul the watery substance to a “sugar house” usually built in the woods. Here’s where the magic happened.

It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup because sap is about 98% water. Sugar makers boiled off most of the water over a wood fire — what they were left with was brown sweet syrup. Some sugar makers heated the sap further, turning it into crystallized sugar. Over time, the industry evolved enough that companies from Quebec to Vermont produced ready-made “evaporators,” essentially giant frying pans with fire boxes built underneath.

As quaint as this image is and as marketable — check out the old-timey drawings on the sides of plastic maple syrup jugs — this is not the face of modern maple syrup making.

These days, most serious sugar makers have foregone labor-intensive buckets, in favor of tubing systems. The holes bored in sugar maples in early spring are usually made with a cordless drill. Sugar makers insert small plastic spouts into the holes and connect the spouts to huge webs of plastic tubing that route the precious sap into large tanks. Many of these sugar bushes even have vacuum systems that suck the sap out of the trees to increase yield, along with oil-fueled furnaces and reverse osmosis filters that remove some water prior to boiling. The technology has changed dramatically, but in essence the process is virtually the same. Collect sap, reduce over heat.

As the natural foods movement has picked up steam in recent years, maple syrup has become, along with honey, an increasingly attractive alternative to processed cane sugar. If you’re wondering where Aunt Jemima or Log Cabin syrup fit into this picture — these common table products are not real maple syrup. The tagline for Log Cabin, which is made with sugar, is “Authentic Maple Tasting Syrup for over 120 years.” This careful wording is intentional and crafted to avoid false advertising claims. (Most brands of maple-flavored pancake toppings are made with corn syrup.)

The actual maple syrup industry has grown some 10% in each of the past four years — and no, maple syrup it not just for flapjacks. These days, some maple syrup devotees use the liquid sweetener as a substitute for sugar in everything from cakes to stir fry. And let’s not forget the Master Cleanse diet — more accurately a fast — in which people eat nothing for days on end, subsisting only on a drink made of water, lemon juice, cayenne pepper and maple syrup.

Thanks to increasing demand and poor sugaring weather in some regions over the past several years, retail prices have spiked to as much as $80 per gallon in some places. In the current sagging economy, that definitely counts as a sweet spot.

Are You Hungry Riverside? | Vicky’s Burgers Jurupa Valley | Burgers Inland Empire

vickys-burgers-riverside-restaurants-inland-empireHungry? Get ready to lick your plate clean at Vicky’s Burgers in Riverside. Order a cheeseburger or just stick with a side of fries at Vicky’s Burgers serving those dining in the Riverside region of the Inland Empire.

Want to enjoy our restaurant without the wait? Get it to go.

Endless parking options are readily available here at Vicky’s Burgers. You’ll also find plenty of safe spaces to lock up your bike if you prefer to cycle to our restaurant.

Prices don’t get much better than this either, with typical meals running under the $15 mark.