Category Archives: diners riverside

Grass-fed beef | Burgers Inland Empire | Organic Beef Burgers

Organic, Natural or Grass-Fed: what’s the difference?

When it comes to choosing meat for your family, you usually want the best you can get at the price you can afford. But, what do those labels really mean? Let’s explore…

Organic – Organically raised livestock must be in compliance with the National Organic program rules beginning in the last 1/3 of gestation .They must be fed only organic feed and allowed to graze only organically-managed pastures. They are not to be given hormones or any other growth-promoting agents and only allowed to be administered vaccines when they are not sick. Additionally, they must be allowed access to the outdoors. All of these regulations are certified by agencies accredited through the USDA. In order to place the organic sticker on the label of a product, it must be made with 95% or greater organic ingredients. Typically, meat labeled “organic” is much more expensive because its more expensive to produce.

Natural – A lot of people think that natural and organic and natural are the same…they’re not. Natural labeled products must be…a product containing no artificial ingredient or added color and is only minimally processed. Minimal processing means that he product was processed in a manner that does not fundamentally alter the product. The label must include a statement explaining the meaning of the term natural (such as “no artificial ingredients or minimally processed”.)

So, natural is fairly open-ended, usually accompanying a claim like “no antibiotics added or maybe grass-fed.” Keep in mind, if the label doesn’t say “grass fed” or “no antibiotics”, chances are they’re not.

Grass-Fed – Most cattle producers feed their cattle grain for the last 3-4 months of their life. This is an efficient way to fatten the cattle to the point where consumers like to eat beef. Grass-fed beef is usually leaner and with a stronger flavor than grain-fed beef. Grass-feeding take longer to get the cattle large enough to slaughter, producing not as much meat, resulting in higher cost.

Best Burger San Bernardino | Premium Burgers Inland Empire | Restaurants Inland Empire

Vicky's BurgerAt Vicky’s Burger, we don’t serve fast food, we serve great food, since 1995

Vicky’s Burger in San Bernardino is the only choice for the best tasting burgers in the Inland Empire.  Made with premium ingredients, Vicky’s Burger is the place to go in the Inland Empire for hot, fresh and delicious burgers.  Also serving delicious milkshakes and a range of fantastic desserts to round off your meal.  Chosen as the official burger at several major venues, to be enjoyed by the fans, its sure to please the crowd at your house too.  Stop by and give us a try to see why everyone is talking about Vicky’s Burger.

Burgers Inland Empire | Best Burgers Inland Empire | Vicky’s Burger

Why Are Burgers and Fries Commonly Served Together?th2

I’ve asked myself the same question a while back. There isn’t much literature on the subject (the well documented ones already build on a culture of burgers and fries) but a number of reasons come to mind.

Burgers are finger-food. To serve something with them that requires utensils would be counterproductive to the idea of “on-the-go eating.” So, in the starch group, only fried potatoes remain.

Fries go well with the condiments and sauces used on burgers. Ketchup, mayonnaise, even mustard, are commonly used with fries; in the UK, vinegar based sauces are also in heavy rotation.

Fries are easily made and – like the burger – are low-involvement finishers. That means they can be pre-made to a close proximity of finish and take about as long to be done as a meat patty on the grill.

Burger Restaurants | Diner Food | Vicky’s Burgers

Vicky’s Burgers, an American Classic

vickys-burgers-riverside-restaurants-inland-empireHungry? Get ready to lick your plate clean.  Vicky’s Burgers serves classic diner food and is nothing short of amazing! Serving those dining in the Riverside region of the Inland Empire for over 25 years.  Want to enjoy our restaurant without the wait? Get it to go.  Endless parking options are readily available and you’ll also find plenty of safe spaces to lock up your bike if you prefer to cycle to our restaurant.  Prices don’t get much better than this either, with typical meals running under the $15 mark. Come visit us today!

History of Maple Syrup | Breakfast Corona | Breakfast Jurupa Valley

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In case you wanted to know or were just curious, here is a great little write up from Time Magazine on the history of Maple Syrup by

When you think of maple syrup, whose 2009 season is just now wrapping up, the first image that pops into your mind is probably a huge tree trunk with a few metal buckets strapped on. Maybe you picture workhorses slogging through the snow, a sleigh laden with tree sap in tow. Maybe there’s a little wooden shack with a chimney emitting a plume of steam. What you might not picture are the dollar signs many are seeing around this surging agricultural commodity — maple syrup producers are celebrating high yields and record retail prices this year.

For some 300 years, however, sugaring stuck close by that rural idyll. Early settlers in the U.S. Northeast and Canada learned about sugar maples from Native Americans. Various legends exist to explain the initial discovery. One is that the chief of a tribe threw a tomahawk at a tree, sap ran out and his wife boiled venison in the liquid. Another version holds that Native Americans stumbled on sap running from a broken maple branch.

From the 17th century onward, dairy farmers who wanted to supplement their income from milk — or who just needed a source of sweetener that was better and cheaper than sugar or molasses — drilled small holes in the trees during the brief weather window between winter and spring. (Sap typically runs out of maple trees on days when the temperature is around 40 degrees following a night when the mercury dropped below freezing.) The farmers called the maple tree stands “sugar bushes” and hung buckets under the drilled holes. Every day or two — depending on how fast the sap was running out of the trees — the farmers would empty out the buckets into larger containers or tanks and haul the watery substance to a “sugar house” usually built in the woods. Here’s where the magic happened.

It takes about 40 gallons of sap to make one gallon of maple syrup because sap is about 98% water. Sugar makers boiled off most of the water over a wood fire — what they were left with was brown sweet syrup. Some sugar makers heated the sap further, turning it into crystallized sugar. Over time, the industry evolved enough that companies from Quebec to Vermont produced ready-made “evaporators,” essentially giant frying pans with fire boxes built underneath.

As quaint as this image is and as marketable — check out the vintage drawings on the sides of plastic maple syrup jugs — this is not the face of modern maple syrup making.

These days, most serious sugar makers have foregone labor-intensive buckets, in favor of tubing systems. The holes bored in sugar maples in early spring are usually made with a cordless drill. Sugar makers insert small plastic spouts into the holes and connect the spouts to huge webs of plastic tubing that route the precious sap into large tanks. Many of these sugar bushes even have vacuum systems that suck the sap out of the trees to increase yield, along with oil-fueled furnaces and reverse osmosis filters that remove some water prior to boiling. The technology has changed dramatically, but in essence the process is virtually the same. Collect sap, reduce over heat.

As the natural foods movement has picked up steam in recent years, maple syrup has become, along with honey, an increasingly attractive alternative to processed cane sugar. If you’re wondering where Aunt Jemima or Log Cabin syrup fit into this picture — these common table products are not real maple syrup. The tagline for Log Cabin, which is made with sugar, is “Authentic Maple Tasting Syrup for over 120 years.” This careful wording is intentional and crafted to avoid false advertising claims. (Most brands of maple-flavored pancake toppings are made with corn syrup.)

The actual maple syrup industry has grown some 10% in each of the past four years — and no, maple syrup it not just for flapjacks. These days, some maple syrup devotees use the liquid sweetener as a substitute for sugar in everything from cakes to stir fry. And let’s not forget the Master Cleanse diet — more accurately a fast — in which people eat nothing for days on end, subsisting only on a drink made of water, lemon juice, cayenne pepper and maple syrup.

Thanks to increasing demand and poor sugaring weather in some regions over the past several years, retail prices have spiked to as much as $80 per gallon in some places. In the current sagging economy, that definitely counts as a sweet spot.

Burger Restaurants Inland Empire | Vicky’s Burgers | Burger Restaurants Riverside

Hungry? Vicky’s Burgers can help with that

Vicky’s Burgers would love to assist you in your hunger needs! Come visit us for Breakfast, Lunch or Dinner 7 days a week! Always fresh, always HOT! At Vicky’s Burger we don’t just have burgers but also delicious milkshakes and a range of fantastic desserts to round out your meal, they are worth the calories.

 

Burger Restaurants | Value of Fresh Lettuce and Tomatoes | Vicky’s Burger

Fresh Lettuce and Tomatoes

Lettuce and tomatoes both help you reach your weekly veggie intake — 21 cups for men or 17.5 cups for women, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. They offer some nutritional differences — for instance, tomatoes contain the cancer-fighting compound lycopene, a nutrient not found in lettuce. However, lettuce and tomatoes also share a few common essential nutrients that help maintain your health.

Fiber

Tomatoes and lettuce both provide you with fiber. Fiber aids in healthy digestion. A cup of chopped tomatoes provides 2.2 grams of fiber toward this goal. Romaine, butter lettuce and iceberg lettuce contain 2, 1.2 or 1.8 grams of fiber, respectively, per two-cup serving.

Vitamin C

Incorporating tomatoes and lettuce into your diet also helps you reach your recommended daily intake of vitamin C, also called ascorbic acid. Tomatoes serve as a rich source of ascorbic acid. A cup of chopped tomatoes contains 25 milligrams of vitamin C — one-third of the 75 milligrams required daily for women and 28 percent of the 90 milligrams needed for men, according to the NYU Langone Medical Center. Lettuce contains smaller amounts of vitamin C, with a 2-cup serving of romaine, butter lettuce or iceberg lettuce each providing approximately 4 milligrams of ascorbic acid. Your body uses this vitamin C to nourish your immune system, aid in wound healing and promote healthy brain function.

Vitamin A

Tomatoes and lettuce — particularly romaine lettuce — boost your intake of vitamin A. Your body uses vitamin A to aid in cell communication and the vitamin A in your system helps to guide cell development. Vitamin A also helps your body for rhodopsin, a chemical important to vision. Men need 3,000 international units of vitamin A daily to maintain good health, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements, while women need 2,333 IU. A two-cup serving of either romaine or butter lettuce provides your entire daily intake of vitamin A, containing 8,188 IU or 3,644 IU of vitamin A, respectively. Tomatoes contain 1,499 IU of vitamin A per cup, and a two-cup serving of iceberg lettuce provides 722 IU of vitamin A.

Burger Restaurants | Best Burger Inland Empire | Vicky’s Burger

 

 

 

See what people are saying about Vicky’s Burger on Yelp! Then stop by to see for yourself why Vicky’s Burger is a favorite in the IE!

Breakfast Inland Empire | Vicky’s Burgers | Breakfast Burritos

Egg Burritos

Join us at Vicky’s Burgers for a delicious breakfast treat, the egg burrito.  Our breakfast burritos are wrapped in a warm flour tortilla and served with two eggs, home fries and cheese

Egg burrito, $4.05

Steak $8.99

Pastrami $8.69

Three meat (choice of 3: ham, bacon, sausage, chorizo or Polish) $5.95

Ham, bacon, sausage, chorizo or Polish $5.05

Vicky’s Burger – WE DON’T SERVE FAST FOOD, WE SERVE GREAT FOOD, SINCE 1995

Restaurants Inland Empire | Dinner San Bernardino | Diner Jurupa Valley

Vickys-fresh-ingredients-burgers-inland-empire-restaurantFreshness First – The Importance of Using Fresh Ingredients in Cooking

Every time you cook, you automatically reach for that can of veggies, fruits or preserved meat for your dish. Whether it is for yourself and your family, or your guests, your cooking almost always includes processed ingredients straight from the freezer or sealed packet. The fault of using processed or frozen ingredients lies not in the cooking style, but in the lifestyle. We simply do not have the time to search for and buy fresh ingredients every day.

In that process, we are jeopardizing our health and wealth. If you are a fan of canned food or eating out of the box, here are a few reasons that will make you choose fresh ingredients over processed ones.

Freshness for health

Fresh ingredients are always better for preparing healthy food, when compared to processed ingredients. Fresh ingredients are basically those that haven’t been exposed to chemicals or processed in any way to increase their shelf life. They have to be consumed on the same day or within a day or two. Fresh ingredients, including fresh vegetables, meat, spices like basil, cilantro, tomatoes, garlic also retain their nutritious value when you cook them right. Unlike processed foods, they are pure and not adulterated in any way, by exposure to preservatives and other such chemicals.

Food cooked with fresh ingredients is healthier than food cooked with processed ingredients or those stored using preservatives.

Fresh ingredients for better tasting food

When it comes to taste, nothing can beat fresh ingredients. The flavor in the food you cook is best when you use fresh ingredients – whether it is succulent meat, fresh produce, basil that is freshly grown in your own yard, ripe tomatoes from the plant you grew in your window – all of them taste a lot better fresh than preserved. At Vicky’s Restaurants we use fresh ingredients, come try us out and you will agree that food tastes better with fresh ingredients.