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Best Hamburger Buns | Burger Buns | Vicky’s Burger

The Best Hamburger Buns

The next time you decide to make hamburgers, consider your burger bun options beyond the standard sesame seed or plain white bun for your burger.

  • Ciabatta roll: This thick and sturdy Italian-style bread provides excellent structure for even the juiciest burgers.
  • English muffin: This round and sturdy muffin seems as if it was made for burgers but make sure you toast it slightly first.
  • Kaiser roll: Easily found in your supermarket bakery department, its soft fluffy interior is the perfect vehicle for juicy backyard burgers.
  • Onion roll: Also easily found in your local supermarket, the onion roll provides a zesty accompaniment to any burger by adding a bit of character.
  • Potato roll: By far, the softest and fluffiest of all burger buns.
  • Pretzel roll: Perfectly salty and chewy, this bun takes burger buns to the next level.
  • Sliced bread: The original burger bun. Breads with a denser texture hold up well to thicker patties.

Vicky’s Burger,  502 S. Waterman Ave., San Bernardino, (909) 888-1171

Cheeseburgers | Best Cheeses for Burgers | Burgers

The Best Cheeses for Burgers

Everyone loves a big juicy burger. And, you’d be hard pressed to find a better topping than a delicious piece of cheese.  Most people have their preference of cheese, American, cheddar, blue, etc. Me, I like them all and sometimes I’ll combine a few just to make it interesting.  Here’s a list of six cheeses that will make the most of your burgers.

  • Cheddar By far, the most popular behind American cheese. It holds up well to strong flavors like bacon and barbecue sauces and melts beautifully.
  • Blue There are a wide variety of blue cheeses: gorgonzola, stilton, Shropshire blue and the like. While some are more pungent than others, these are all typically salty and, quite frankly, stinky but delicious. These work well with a sweet/savory component.
  • Monterey Jack One of the best melting cheeses and thanks to its mild flavor, can handle a variety of different flavor combos.
  • Goat This tangy, crumbly cheese is a lighter burger type cheese.
  • Smoked Gouda This cheese pairs perfectly with smoky barbecue sauce and adds a decadent touch to burgers. Also works well with spicy touches like horseradish.
  • Brie This cheese handles a variety of tasks. From topping burgers to topping turkey sandwiches this should be a go-to. it works especially well with sliced apples and carmalized onions.

Fast Food Restaurant | Burgers | American Diner

Vicky’s Burger: A great American Diner

Vicky’s Burger is a fast-food restaurant serving burgers and other great American eats in an unpretentious relaxed setting. Located in the heart of San Bernardino, its a great place to catch a quick bite with the family.  Enjoy the outdoor seating in a casual setting, while choosing from a vast selection of quick healthy bites. Just check out some of the delicious creations below:

Vicky’s Burger, 502 S. Waterman Ave., San Bernardino, CA 92408 909.888.1171

Vicky’s Burger | American Diner | San Bernardino Restaurants

Vicky’s Burger: serving great food since 1995

Since opening our doors in 1995, Vicky’s Burger is the quintessential American diner serving the San Bernardino area.  We focus on fast and friendly service, serving good, hot food at extremely reasonable prices.  At Vicky’s Burger, we take great pride in serving our guests great food, made with only the highest quality ingredients.  Bringing you fast food in a very unique way, Vicky’s Burger has something for everyone.  Why don’t you stop by and give us a try? Vicky’s Burger, 502 S. Waterman Ave., San Bernardino, CA 92408, (909) 888-1171. Open Monday through Friday, 6:00 a.m. – 6:00 p.m. and Saturday through Sunday, 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m.

Restaurants Inland Empire | Dinner San Bernardino | Diner Jurupa Valley

Vickys-fresh-ingredients-burgers-inland-empire-restaurantFreshness First – The Importance of Using Fresh Ingredients in Cooking

Every time you cook, you automatically reach for that can of veggies, fruits or preserved meat for your dish. Whether it is for yourself and your family, or your guests, your cooking almost always includes processed ingredients straight from the freezer or sealed packet. The fault of using processed or frozen ingredients lies not in the cooking style, but in the lifestyle. We simply do not have the time to search for and buy fresh ingredients every day.

In that process, we are jeopardizing our health and wealth. If you are a fan of canned food or eating out of the box, here are a few reasons that will make you choose fresh ingredients over processed ones.

Freshness for health

Fresh ingredients are always better for preparing healthy food, when compared to processed ingredients. Fresh ingredients are basically those that haven’t been exposed to chemicals or processed in any way to increase their shelf life. They have to be consumed on the same day or within a day or two. Fresh ingredients, including fresh vegetables, meat, spices like basil, cilantro, tomatoes, garlic also retain their nutritious value when you cook them right. Unlike processed foods, they are pure and not adulterated in any way, by exposure to preservatives and other such chemicals.

Food cooked with fresh ingredients is healthier than food cooked with processed ingredients or those stored using preservatives.

Fresh ingredients for better tasting food

When it comes to taste, nothing can beat fresh ingredients. The flavor in the food you cook is best when you use fresh ingredients – whether it is succulent meat, fresh produce, basil that is freshly grown in your own yard, ripe tomatoes from the plant you grew in your window – all of them taste a lot better fresh than preserved. At Vicky’s Restaurants we use fresh ingredients, come try us out and you will agree that food tastes better with fresh ingredients.

 

Burger Restaurants | Burger Restaurants Inland Empire | Burgers Riverside

See What People are Saying About Vicky’s Burgers on Yelp!

 

Sarah A. from Riverside shares:

What a wonderful place for a great meal!
This restaurant is family and locally owned. The food is amazing. The inside and outside is clean spic and span never dirty.  The prices are perfect for the amount of delicious food served by smiling faces.
This establishment is VERY involved in the community and sponsors our local high school Patriot football GO WARRIORS! with a program called Warrior Wednesday. All anyone has to do is mention WARRIOR WEDNESDAY when placing order and/or paying, then the restaurant will match 10% of your entire bill.  Very generous! We go several times a month and everything we have ever eaten from the homemade potato soup to the breakfast burrito to the Greek salads to the bacon avocado cheeseburger. I could go on and on. Beyond fabulous. Get there now!

Eddie D. of Riverside shares:

Very clean, fast and delicious…going many more times! So glad to have this local treasure!

Jason M. of Cathedral City shares:

Love this place! I’ve been here several times, mostly for breakfast, but everything I’ve ordered has been delicious. I like coming here because I always get great service and the food tastes more homemade than other fast food restaurants. Tonight I got the Greek Chicken salad and it was amazing!

Are You Hungry Riverside? | Vicky’s Burgers Jurupa Valley | Burgers Inland Empire

vickys-burgers-riverside-restaurants-inland-empireHungry? Get ready to lick your plate clean at Vicky’s Burgers in Riverside. Order a cheeseburger or just stick with a side of fries at Vicky’s Burgers serving those dining in the Riverside region of the Inland Empire.

Want to enjoy our restaurant without the wait? Get it to go.

Endless parking options are readily available here at Vicky’s Burgers. You’ll also find plenty of safe spaces to lock up your bike if you prefer to cycle to our restaurant.

Prices don’t get much better than this either, with typical meals running under the $15 mark.

Why Eat Local? | Great Hamburgers Riverside Inland Empire | Restaurants Inland Empire

Here are the 10 reasons you should eat more local food:

  1. Supports local farms: Buying local food keeps local farms healthy and creates local jobs at farms and in local food processing and distribution systems.
  2. Boosts local economy: Food dollars spent at local farms and food producers stay in the local economy, creating more jobs at other local businesses.
  3. Less travel: Local food travels much less distance to market than typical fresh or processed grocery store foods, therefore using less fuel and generating fewer greenhouse gases.
  4. Less waste: Because of the shorter distribution chains for local foods, less food is wasted in distribution, warehousing and merchandising.
  5. More freshness: Local food is fresher, healthier and tastes better, because it spends less time in transit from farm to plate, and therefore, loses fewer nutrients and incurs less spoilage.
  6. New and better flavors: When you commit to buy more local food, you’ll discover interesting new foods, tasty new ways to prepare food and a new appreciation of the pleasure of each season’s foods.
  7. Good for the soil: Local food encourages diversification of local agriculture, which reduces the reliance on monoculture—single crops grown over a wide area to the detriment of soils.
  8. Attracts tourists: Local foods promote agritourism—farmers’ markets and opportunities to visit farms and local food producers help draw tourists to a region.
  9. Preserves open space: Buying local food helps local farms survive and thrive, keeping land from being redeveloped into suburban sprawl.
  10. Builds more connected communities: Local foods create more vibrant communities by connecting people with the farmers and food producers who bring them healthy local foods. As customers of CSAs and farmers markets have discovered, they are great places to meet and connect with friends as well as farmers.

Value Of Fresh Lettuce And Tomato | Best Burgers Inland Empire | Riverside Restaurants

lettuce-tomato-vickys-burgersLettuce and tomatoes both help you reach your weekly veggie intake — 21 cups for men or 17.5 cups for women, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. They offer some nutritional differences — for instance, tomatoes contain the cancer-fighting compound lycopene, a nutrient not found in lettuce. However, lettuce and tomatoes also share a few common essential nutrients that help maintain your health.

Fiber

Tomatoes and lettuce both provide you with fiber. Fiber aids in healthy digestion. A cup of chopped tomatoes provides 2.2 grams of fiber toward this goal. Romaine, butterhead and iceberg lettuce contain 2, 1.2 or 1.8 grams of fiber, respectively, per two-cup serving.

Vitamin C

Incorporating tomatoes and lettuce into your diet also helps you reach your recommended daily intake of vitamin C, also called ascorbic acid. Tomatoes serve as a rich source of ascorbic acid. A cup of chopped tomatoes contains 25 milligrams of vitamin C — one-third of the 75 milligrams required daily for women and 28 percent of the 90 milligrams needed for men, according to the NYU Langone Medical Center. Lettuce contains smaller amounts of vitamin C, with a 2-cup serving of romaine, butterhead or iceberg lettuce each providing approximately 4 milligrams of ascorbic acid. Your body uses this vitamin C to nourish your immune system, aid in wound healing and promote healthy brain function.

Vitamin A

Tomatoes and lettuce — particularly romaine lettuce — boost your intake of vitamin A. Your body uses vitamin A to aid in cell communication, and the vitamin A in your system helps to guide cell development. Vitamin A also helps your body for rhodopsin, a chemical important to vision. Men need 3,000 international units of vitamin A daily to maintain good health, according to the Office of Dietary Supplements, while women need 2,333 IU. A two-cup serving of either romaine or butterhead lettuce provides your entire daily intake of vitamin A, containing 8,188 IU or 3,644 IU of vitamin A, respectively. Tomatoes contain 1,499 IU of vitamin A per cup, and a two-cup serving of iceberg lettuce provides 722 IU of vitamin A.

History Of The Pancake | Breakfast Riverside | San Bernardino Restaurants | Pancakes Inland Empire | Vicky’s Burgers Jurupa Valley

Here is a great article posted by National Geographic about the history of the pancake…“one of our faves here at Vicky’s Burgers“!

pancake_stack_breakfast_riverside_inland_empire_corona_san_bernadino_jurupa_valley_vickys

Hot off the Griddle, Here’s the History of Pancakes

Our prehistoric ancestors just may have eaten pancakes.

Analyses of starch grains on 30,000-year-old grinding tools suggest that Stone Age cooks were making flour out of cattails and ferns—which, researchers guess, was likely mixed with water and baked on a hot, possibly greased, rock. The result may have been more akin to hardtack than the modern crepe, hotcake, or flapjack, but the idea was the same: a flat cake, made from batter and fried.

Pancake Day: The Most Wonderful Day of the Year

By the time Otzi the Iceman set off on his final hike 5,300 years ago, pancakes—or at least something pancake-like—seem to have been a common item of diet. Otzi, whose remains were discovered in a rocky gully in the Italian Alps in 1991, provided us with a wealth of information about what a denizen of the Neolithic ate. His last meals—along with red deer and ibex—featured ground einkorn wheat. The bits of charcoal he consumed along with it suggest that it was in the form of a pancake, cooked over an open fire.

Whatever the age of the primal pancake, it’s clearly an ancient form of food, as evidenced by its ubiquity in cultural traditions across the globe. The ancient Greeks and Romans ate pancakes, sweetened with honey; the Elizabethans ate them flavored with spices, rosewater, sherry, and apples. They were traditionally eaten in quantity on Shrove Tuesday or Pancake Day, a day of feasting and partying before the beginning of Lent.  Pancakes were a good way to use up stores of about-to-be-forbidden perishables like eggs, milk, and butter, and a yummy last hurrah before the upcoming grim period of church-mandated fast.

In the American colonies, pancakes—known as hoe cakes, johnnycakes, or flapjacks—were made with buckwheat or cornmeal. Amelia Simmons’s American Cookery—thought to be the first all-American cookbook, published in 1796—has two recipes for pancakes, one for “Johny Cake, or Hoe Cake,” which calls for milk, “Indian meal,” and molasses, the other for “Indian Slapjack,” which drops the molasses, but adds four eggs.

Thomas Jefferson, who was fond of pancakes, sent a recipe home to Monticello from the President’s House in Washington, D.C., picked up from Etienne Lemaire, his French maître d’hotel (hired for his honesty and skill in making desserts). Lemaire’s “panne-quaiques” were what we would call crepes—made by pouring dollops of thin batter into a hot pan.  Modern pancakes—in Jefferson’s day known as griddlecakes—generally contain a leavening agent and are heftier and puffier.

Flat as a Pancake? Not Likely

The defining characteristic of the entire vast family of pancakes, however—from crepe to griddlecake, blini, bannock, and beyond—is flatness. “Flat as a pancake,” according to the Oxford English Dictionary, has been a catchphrase since at least 1611. Usually it’s applied disparagingly to flat-chested women or to featureless level terrain, such as that of Poland, the glacial plains of Canada, and the state of Kansas.

In 2003, this recurrent comparison led a trio of geographers with senses of humor—after a dullish trip across the American Midwest—to attempt to determine the relative flatnesses of pancakes and Kansas. They constructed a topographic profile of a representative pancake—bought from the local International House of Pancakes—using digital imaging processing and a confocal laser microscope, and a similar profile of Kansas, using data from the United States Geological Survey. The tongue-in-cheek results, published in the Annals of Improbable Research, showed that though pancakes are flat, Kansas is even flatter. Where, mathematically, a value of 1.000 indicates perfect tabletop flatness, Kansas scored a practically horizontal 0.9997. The pancake, in contrast, scored a relatively lumpy 0.957.

In March of this year, Kansan geographers Jerome Dobson and Joshua Campbell—publishing in the wholly reputable Geographical Review – also took on pancakes, pointing out defensively that, while Kansas may be flatter than a pancake, it’s not alone. In fact, there are several states that are even flatter. Their calculations showed that, of the continental states, flattest of the flat is Florida, followed by Illinois, North Dakota, Louisiana, Minnesota, and Delaware. (Least pancake-like: Wyoming, West Virginia, New Hampshire, and Vermont.)

As all researchers hasten to point out, though, the pancake comparison simply isn’t fair. Blow a pancake up to the size of—say, Kansas—and you’ll end up with a fried expanse of ferociously rugged terrain, pock-marked with craters and canyons, studded with Everest-sized air bubbles. Compared to a Kansas-sized pancake—well, practically everything is flat.

The 16th-century measure of flatness was “flat as a flounder.”

Maybe we should go back to that.