Tag Archives: burgers riverside

Bacon Cheeseburger | Burgers Inland Empire | Best Burger Riverside

You’ve never had a bacon-cheeseburger like this before…

This is a super yummy recipe. You can use ready to serve bacon if you’d like. These burgers are seasoned hamburgers stuffed with shredded cheese and bacon. The history of this wonderful creation goes back to the summer of 2010. Tim Thalacker and Andrew Broderick were cooking hamburgers and the bacon and cheese kept sliding off so they wondered what if they could put the bacon and cheese inside the meat? Well they tried it one time and they loved it…they are the smartest people in the world!

Burger Restaurants | Vicky’s Burger | Breakfast Specials Jurupa Valley

Come Visit Vicky’s Burgers For Our Delicious Daily Features!

Pancake Special

  • 2 Pancakes, 2 Eggs, 2 Bacon or Sausage $4.49

Lunch Special

  • Fish Taco $1.49
  • Bacon Burger & Fries Combo $7.50

Weekend Specials

  • Menudo $6.50

 

Burger Restaurants | Vicky’s Burger | Burgers Riverside

BURGER MENU

All of our burgers are served with 1,000 island dressing, lettuce, tomato, onion and pickle on a white bun (wheat buns on request).

  • 1/4 LB Burger $3.20
  • Double Burger $4.70
  • 1/4 LB Cheeseburger $3.70
  • Double Cheeseburger $5.40
  • Chili Burger $3.99 (our famous chili with onion, lettuce, tomato and pickle)
  • Ortega Swiss Burger $4.80
  • Bacon Burger $4.30
  • BBQ Bacon Cheeseburger $4.50 (bbq sauce, bacon, cheese with onion rings)
  • Garden Burger $4.45
  • Turkey Burger $3.99 (mayo, lettuce, tomato and pickle)
  • Colossal Burger $5.75 (add pastrami and mustard)
  • Avocado Burger $4.85
  • Protein Burger $6.20 (double bacon cheeseburger, lettuce wrapped)
  • Junior Burger $2.40

 

Burger Restaurants Inland Empire | Vicky’s Burger | Great Burger

The Makings of a Great Burger

 

 

The bun:  Often overlooked, the bun in the burger aficionado world seems to be the soft, rich brioche style. This, in my opinion, is the choice of someone who hasn’t thought through the practicalities in sufficient detail. A deftly cooked burger, dripping with greasy juices, and topped with piquant sauces, will see off such a bun in minutes, leading to its inevitable sad, soggy abandonment – how many times have you had to pick up a knife and fork to finish things off? (In the case of Patty and Bun, notorious for its gloriously messy creations, it’s advisable to keep the burger in its paper wrapping to the very last bite to save your dignity).

The burger:  A high fat content is key to success – John Torode reckons “the best formula will be about 40% fat, otherwise it will not be moist.” Chuck or brisket are good places to start, but the main thing to ensure is that there’s enough flavor, which means well-aged beef: New Jersey butchers Pat LaFrieda uses 50-day dry-aged prime rib in their patties, which may or may not be going too far. A coarser grind will give a more satisfyingly meaty texture – if you don’t have your own machine, the butchers you’ll no doubt have had to visit to source your decent beef should be happy to do it for you. Real burger purists will stop there, but for a really juicy, intensely savory result, add breadcrumbs soaked in stout. For a decent crust, salt your burgers just before searing them on a smoking hot grill or pan – and go no further than medium rare. A well-done burger is nothing short of a chewy tragedy.

The cheese:  Not mandatory, of course – but a very welcome addition. American cheese, is amazingly popular among modern burger pushers, mainly because it melts very easily. Most prefer a cheese you can actually taste, even if it doesn’t drip so fetchingly down the sides of the burger – a mature cheddar is a great choice, added to the patty during cooking so it drapes round it like a cloak.

The pickles:  With enough decent pickles, you won’t miss that salad – spicy Korean kimchi is the latest fermented fad. Add a few thin slices of red onion, briefly soaked in vinegar to rob them of their anti-social bite, and you’re in pickle heaven.

Sauces:  You can get as fancy as you like here. A popular choice is a Thousand Island type dressing. A good burger only deserves the best.

Burger Restaurants | Vicky’s Burger | Best Burger

welcomeImgCraving a delicious burger?

Then look no further than Vicky’s Burger.  With two locations conveniently located in Riverside and San Bernardino, Vicky’s Burger is the place to experience a delicious burger.  We use only the freshest, high-quality ingredients to satisfy your burger craving.  Stop by Vicky’s Burger to experience the Vicky’s Burger difference. Open Monday through Friday, 6am-6pm and Weekends, 7am-3pm.

Burger Restaurants | Vicky’s Burger | Burgers Riverside

Are French Fries Really French?

The French are responsible for giving the world a lot of things. They gave us the hot air balloon, bikinis and the sewing machine. However, what they can’t claim is the french fry!

Despite its name, french fries aren’t French at all. They actually date back to the late 1600’s in Belgium. Belgian lore states that poor villagers from Meuse Valley often ate small fried fish that were caught in the river. However, during the winter months, when fishing was scarce, they had to rely on other foods for nourishment…enter the potato.

The villagers turned to the humble potato, slicing and frying the same way they did the fish. Just like that, the earliest french fries were born. But, what about that name? “French” fries…

During World War I, American soldiers stationed in Belgium were first introduced to french fries. The official language of the Belgian army was French, so, soldiers nicknamed the delicious fried spuds “French fries.” Now you know.

Burger Restaurants | Vicky’s Burger | Burgers Riverside

great-burger-riverside-san-bernardino-vickysWhat Makes a Great Burger?

 

The bun

Often overlooked, the bun in the burger aficionado world seems to be the soft, rich brioche style. This, in my opinion, is the choice of someone who hasn’t thought through the practicalities in sufficient detail. A deftly cooked burger, dripping with greasy juices, and topped with piquant sauces, will see off such a bun in minutes, leading to its inevitable sad, soggy abandonment – how many times have you had to pick up a knife and fork to finish things off? (In the case of Patty and Bun, notorious for its gloriously messy creations, it’s advisable to keep the burger in its paper wrapping to the very last bite to save your dignity).

The burger

A high fat content is key to success – John Torode reckons “the best formula will be about 40% fat, otherwise it will not be moist.” Chuck or brisket are good places to start, but the main thing to ensure is that there’s enough flavor, which means well-aged beef: New Jersey butchers Pat LaFrieda uses 50-day dry-aged prime rib in their patties, which may or may not be going too far. A coarser grind will give a more satisfyingly meaty texture – if you don’t have your own machine, the butchers you’ll no doubt have had to visit to source your decent beef should be happy to do it for you. Real burger purists will stop there, but for a really juicy, intensely savory result, add breadcrumbs soaked in stout. For a decent crust, salt your burgers just before searing them on a smoking hot grill or pan – and go no further than medium rare. A well-done burger is nothing short of a chewy tragedy.

The cheese

Not mandatory, of course – but a very welcome addition. American cheese, is amazingly popular among modern burger pushers, mainly because it melts very easily. Most prefer a cheese you can actually taste, even if it doesn’t drip so fetchingly down the sides of the burger – a mature cheddar is a great choice, added to the patty during cooking so it drapes round it like a cloak.

The pickles

With enough decent pickles, you won’t miss that salad – spicy Korean kimchi is the latest fermented fad. Add a few thin slices of red onion, briefly soaked in vinegar to rob them of their anti-social bite, and you’re in pickle heaven.

Sauces

You can get as fancy as you like here. A popular choice is a Thousand Island type dressing. A good burger only deserves the best.

Burger Restaurants | Vicky’s Burgers | Burgers Riverside

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Burger Restaurants | Breakfast Burger | Vicky’s Burgers

Breakfast Burger

I remember as a child when, on the rare occasion, my mom would make breakfast for dinner.  My sister and I would squeal with excitement.  However, it usually ended up with pancakes or French toast and not the glorious breakfast burger.  Let’s face it, the hamburger is nearly the perfect food (at least in my mind) and can be eaten at any time of day.  So, it naturally made sense to have it for breakfast.  This breakfast burger is full of all those juicy delicious ingredients that you love on your lunch or dinner burgers but with the addition of fluffy egg and hashbrowns. Yum! (4 servings)

Ingredients:

4 hamburger buns

4 hashbrown patties, cooked in oven until golden and crispy

1 lb. ground beef (I prefer 80/20 for the fat content)

4 slices American cheese (other cheese works well but I like the melting quotient)

1 tbl. butter

4 eggs, scrambled

8 slices thick cut bacon

Salt and pepper, to taste

1/2 c ketchup

Instructions:

  1. Using a large cast iron pan, cook your bacon until crisp, removing all but one tablespoon of fat.
  2. Form the ground beef into 4 patties, pressing your thumb in the middle to create a little cavern (this keeps the pattie in shape as it cooks).
  3. Season with salt and pepper.
  4. Cook patties on medium-high for 3 minutes per side
  5. Remove patties, reduce heat to low and add the buns, cut side down to toast. Remove when golden.
  6. Meanwhile, in a large separate large pan, melt butter, adding the scrambled eggs.  Cook low and slow until they are cooked through (this will take a while). You don’t want any browned or lacy edges so make sure you pay attention.
  7. Stack the bottom bun with a hashbrown pattie, ketchup, slice American cheese, 1/4 of the folded egg, ketchup and the top bun.
  8. Serve immediately and ENJOY!

Burger Restaurants | Vicky’s Burgers | Hashbrowns

Hashbrowns: the history behind this delectable side dish

“Hashing” foods is a concept that has been around since the 1500’s.

As further evidence that hash browns came about earlier, the Minnesota Farmers’ Institute Annual of 1835 is the first time a hash brown recipe was printed. There were three recipes in fact, for hash potatoes, brown hashed potatoes, and brown creamed hash potatoes.

Indeed, hash browns were called hashed brown potatoes, and the name shortened over time. The term “hashed brown potatoes” was first mentioned by food author Maria Parloa in 1888.

The “hashed brown potatoes” gained popularity in New York City hotels during the 1890’s, and officially became hash browns as recently as 1970.

To further add to the confusion, the term “hash browns” was mentioned in America prior to 1970 – it was used by a character in the pilot episode of The Twilight Zone, in 1959.

Hash browns can be made several different ways, incorporating a variety of ingredients, including leftovers or whatever the heck happens to be in the fridge. A few of the popular hash brown variations are. . .chopped or cubed, patties, or “cakes”, shredded, And of course, in a casserole style