Scrambled Egg Breakfast Corona | Breakfast And Lunch Riverside | Vicky’s Burgers Inland Empire

Rührei auf einem Teller
Rührei auf einem Teller

What can we tell you about “scrambled” eggs? We know that Ancient Romans scrambled eggs (ie, broke the yolks and mixed them with the albumen), mixed them up with vegetables and spices, and baked them. These were the first omelettes.

Recipes and methods vary according to time, place and cook’s taste. There is no one “official” recipe; but a plethora of culinary choices. Eggs can be mixed together before cooking, extra ingredients (cream, water, butter, cheese, diced vegetables) may be introduced at any time. Some cooks scramble at the end when the eggs are almost cooked; others prefer constant agitation. Should the final product be yellow or white and yellow? One thing is for certain: on Western European and Americn tables, scrambled eggs were meant to be accompanied by hot buttered toast!

Recipes and methods vary according to time, place and cook’s taste. There is no one “official” recipe; but a plethora of culinary choices. Eggs can be mixed together before cooking, extra ingredients (cream, water, butter, cheese, diced vegetables) may be introduced at any time. Some cooks scramble at the end when the eggs are almost cooked; others prefer constant agitation. Should the final product be yellow or white and yellow? One thing is for certain: on Western European and American tables, scrambled eggs were meant to be accompanied by hot buttered toast!

Scrambled eggs are perfect for breakfast, lunch (Western Sandwich), main course (Egg Foo Young) and midnight snack (24 hour diner fare).

This 14th century Italian text references “scrambled eggs”
“There is so much known about fried, roasted, and scrambled eggs that it is not necessary to speak about them” (from the fourteenth-century Libro della cucina).”
Italian Cuisine: A Cultural History, Alberto Capatti & Massimo Montanari [Columbia University Press:New York] 2003 (p. 77)
[NOTE: This 14th century book is Zambrini, Il libro della cucina del sec. XIV, p. 73. We do not have a copy of this book.]

15th century Italian cookbooks offer a variety of egg dishes. One can discover the similarity to contemporary “scrambled” eggs by reading the method. These were not called “scrambled eggs,” nor can we tell exactly what the finished product would have looked like. This recipe does not mention the egg yolk at all…was it beaten in? Or omitted altogether…leaving the finished product white?

“Eggs Like Fritters. —Platina: On Right Pleasure and Good Health, a critical edition an translation of De Honesta Voluptate et Valetudine, Mary Ella Milham [Medieval & Renaissance Texts & Studies:Tempe AZ] 1998, Book IX recipe 25 (p. 403)

Martino [Napoli,15th century] offers a recipe for scrambled eggs and cheese, which Terence Scully, noted culinary historian and translator states “is unknown elsewhere. The qualification “in the German fashion: is interesting–but not helpful.”


SOURCE: The Neapolitan Recipe Collection, Cuoco Napoletano, Terence Scully [University of Michigan Press:An Arbor] 2000 (p. 154)
[NOTEs: this book also contains the original wording of the recipe (p. 74); Mr. Scully does not include the history of scrambled eggs in this book.]

[16th Century England]
In England, “buttered eggs,” scrambled eggs cooked with butter and cream, were known by the 16th century. The term “scrambled” appeared a century later. “Eggs served with butter were familiar fasting-day food in Tudor times. Buttered eggs, later to be known as scrambled eggs, came into the cookery books in the seventeenth century. They were laid upon buttered rounds of toasted manchet [bread], and the dish was garnished with pepper and salt.”
Food and Drink in Britain: From the Stone Age to the 19th Century, C. Anne Wilson [Academy Chicago:Chicago] 1991 (p. 144)


 

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